SDE: Lead Poisoning Guidelines - Endnotes

Endnotes

  1. Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry.
  2. Lidsky TI; Schneider JS. Lead neurotoxicity in children: basic mechanisms and clinical correlates. Brain. 2003;126(1):5-19. AbstractFull TextFull Text (PDF).
  3. US Dep. Health Hum. Serv., Public Health Serv. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1991. Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives. DHHS Publ. (PHS) 91–5022.
  4. Jacobs DE, Clickner RP, Zhou JY, et al. The prevalence of lead-based paint hazards in U.S. housing. Environ Health Perspect.2002;110 :A599– A606
  5. Committee on Environmental Health, American Academy of Pediatrics. (2005, reaffirmed, 11/2008). Policy Statement: Lead Exposure in Children: Prevention, Detection, and Management. Pediatrics, 116(4):1036–1046.
  6. Lanphear BP, Dietrich KN. And Berger, O. Prevention of Lead Toxicity in US Children. Ambulatory Pediatrics, Volume 3, Issue 1, January–February 2003, Pages 27–36
  7. Committee on Environmental Health, American Academy of Pediatrics. (2005, reaffirmed, 11/2008). Policy Statement: Lead Exposure in Children: Prevention, Detection, and Management. Pediatrics, 116(4):1036–1046.
  8. Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention. Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention. January 4, 2012. Atlanta: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  9. Enton, E. Any lead is too much lead. The Atlantic. January 12, 2012.
  10. Tellez-Rojo MM, Bellinger DC, Arroyo-Quiroz C, Lamadrid,-Figueroa H, Mercado-Garcia, A, Schnaas-Arrieta L, Wright RO, Hernandez-Avila M, and Hu H. Longitudinal Associations Between Blood Lead Concentrations Lower Than 10 µg/dL and Neurobehavioral Development in Environmentally Exposed Children in Mexico City. August 1, 2006. Pediatrics Vol. 118 No. 2 pp. e323 -e330.
  11. Hubbs-Tait, L., Mulugeta, A.,Bogale, A.,Kennedy, T.S.,Baker, E.R.,Stoecker, B.J.  Main and interaction effects of iron, zinc, lead, and parenting on children’s cognitive outcomes. Developmental Neuropsychology. Volume 34, Issue 2, March 2009, Pages 175-195.
  12. Lanphear BP, Dietrich K, Auinger P, Cox C. Cognitive deficits associated with blood lead concentrations <10mg/dl in US children and adolescents. Public Health Rep 2000; 115: 521±9.
  13. Koller K, Brown T, Spurgeon A, Levy L. Recent developments in low-level lead exposure and intellectual impairment in children. Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Jun;112 (9):987-94.
  14. Lanphear BP, Hornung R, Khoury J, et al. Low-level environmental lead exposure and children’s intellectual function: an international pooled analysis. Environ Health Perspect. 2005;113(7):894–899.  WEB OF SCIENCE | PUBMED
  15. Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention. Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention. January 4, 2012. Atlanta: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  16. Hubbs-Tait, L., Mulugeta, A.,Bogale, A.,Kennedy, T.S.,Baker, E.R.,Stoecker, B.J.  Main and interaction effects of iron, zinc, lead, and parenting on children’s cognitive outcomes. Developmental Neuropsychology. Volume 34, Issue 2, March 2009, Pages 175-195.
  17. Surkan PJ, Zhang A, Trachtenberg F, Daniel DB, McKinlay, S. and Bellinger DC. Neuropsychological function in children with blood lead levels <10 µg/dL. NeuroToxicology, Volume 28, Issue 6, November 2007, Pages 1170–1177
  18. Hubbs-Tait, L., Nation, J.R., Krebs, N.F., Bellinger, D.C.    Neurotoxicants, micronutrients, and social environments individual and combined effects on children’s development  (Review). Psychological Science in the Public Interest, Supplement. Volume 6, Issue 3, December 2005, Pages 57-121.
  19. Hubbs-Tait, L., Mulugeta, A.,Bogale, A.,Kennedy, T.S.,Baker, E.R.,Stoecker, B.J.  Main and interaction effects of iron, zinc, lead, and parenting on children’s cognitive outcomes. Developmental Neuropsychology. Volume 34, Issue 2, March 2009, Pages 175-195.
  20. Hubbs-Tait, L., Mulugeta, A.,Bogale, A.,Kennedy, T.S.,Baker, E.R.,Stoecker, B.J.  Main and interaction effects of iron, zinc, lead, and parenting on children’s cognitive outcomes. Developmental Neuropsychology. Volume 34, Issue 2, March 2009, Pages 175-195.
  21. Personal communication with Armin Thies, April 5, 2012 
  22. Ruff, Holly A. Population-based data and the development of individual children: The case of low to moderate lead levels and intelligence. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. Vol.20(1), Feb 1999, pp. 42-49.
  23. Lanphear BP, Hornung R, Khoury J, et al Lead and IQ in Children: Lanphear et al. Respond Environ Health Perspect. 2006 February; 114(2): A86–A87.
  24. Miranda Study Phase I, 2012.
  25. Miranda Study Phase II, 2013.
  26. http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/.
  27. http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/ and Report of the Advisory Committee.
  28. Silbergeld, E.K. Preventing Lead Poisoning in Children. Annu. Rev. Public Health. 1997. 18:187–210.
  29. US Dep. Health Hum. Serv., Public Health Serv. 1991. Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives. DHHS Publ. (PHS)91–5022.
  30. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/healthy_people/hp2010/hp2010_final_review.htm
  31. http://healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/overview.aspx?topicid=12
  32. Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention. (January, 2012). Low Level Lead Exposure Harms Children: A Renewed Call for Primary Prevention. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
  33. http://healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/overview.aspx?topicid=12
  34. Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention. (January, 2012). Low Level Lead Exposure Harms Children: A Renewed Call for Primary Prevention. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
  35. Mushak P, Davis JM, Crocetti AF, Grant LD. 1989. Prenatal and postnatal effects of low-level lead exposure: integrated summary of a report to the US Congress on childhood lead poisoning. Environ. Res. 50:11–36; and Silbergeld, E.K. Preventing Lead Poisoning in Children. Annu. Rev. Public Health. 1997. 18:187–210.
  36. CDC Response to Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Recommendations in “Low Level Lead Exposure Harms Children: A Renewed Call of Primary Prevention” . May 16, 2012 http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/ACCLPP/CDC_Response_Lead_Exposure_Recs.pdf
  37. CDC.
  38. Needleman HL, Schell A, Bellinger D, Leviton A, Allred EN. The long-term effects of exposure to low doses of lead in childhood: an 11-year follow-up report. N Engl J Med.1990;322 :83– 88
  39. Tong S, Baghurst PA, Sawyer MG, Burns J, McMichael AJ. Declining blood lead levels and changes in cognitive function during childhood: the Port Pirie Cohort Study. JAMA.1998;280 :1915
  40. Communication with Dr. Armin Thies, PhD, ABPP/ABCN, Associate Clinical Professor and Clinical Neuropsychologist, Yale School of Medicine; Consultant, Westport Public Schools, April 5, 2012.
  41. ibid
  42. Communication with Dr. Sherin Stahl, PhD, Director of Psychological Services, Yale New Haven Regional Lead Treatment Center and Healthy Homes Program, May 1, 2012.
  43. Lidsky TI; Schneider JS. Lead neurotoxicity in children: basic mechanisms and clinical correlates. Brain. 2003;126(1):5-19, p. 11 Abstract Full Text Full Text (PDF).
  44. Communications with Dr. Armin Thies, April, 2012.
  45. Communications with Dr. Armin Thies, April 5, 2012 and Dr. Sherin Stahl, May 1, 2012.
  46. Communication with Dr. Sherin Stahl, May, 2012
  47. 34 Code of Federal Regulations § 300.8(c)(9)
 




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